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Chalk surface paper



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 9th 07, 02:55 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
news.knology.net
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Posts: 6
Default Chalk surface paper

How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?


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  #2  
Old September 9th 07, 03:23 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
Blair (TC)
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Posts: 2,199
Default (RCSD) Chalk surface paper

On Sep 9, 9:55 am, "news.knology.net" wrote:
How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?



Chalky paper, used especially on British stamps, is easy to identify.
Chalk-surfaced stamps when rubbed with silver will leave a black mark
on
them. Be careful when testing these and just touch a small corner or
part
of the stamp.

You can sort out some of the modern ordinary & chalky paper stamp
issues with an Ultra-Violet lamp.

Blair

  #3  
Old September 9th 07, 04:37 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
Nick Bridgwater[_2_]
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Posts: 63
Default (RCSD) Chalk surface paper

Another way to tell chalk surfaced paper is to hold the stamp to the
outside of your (dry) lip - chalk surfaced paper will feel noticeably
colder & smoother than ordinary paper.

Regards,
Nick



"Blair (TC)" wrote in news:1189347815.283579.138440
@d55g2000hsg.googlegroups.com:

On Sep 9, 9:55 am, "news.knology.net" wrote:
How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?



Chalky paper, used especially on British stamps, is easy to identify.
Chalk-surfaced stamps when rubbed with silver will leave a black mark
on
them. Be careful when testing these and just touch a small corner or
part
of the stamp.

You can sort out some of the modern ordinary & chalky paper stamp
issues with an Ultra-Violet lamp.

Blair



  #4  
Old September 9th 07, 05:35 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
Douglas Myall
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Posts: 83
Default (RCSD) Chalk surface paper


"Blair (TC)" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Sep 9, 9:55 am, "news.knology.net" wrote:
How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?



Chalky paper, used especially on British stamps, is easy to

identify.
Chalk-surfaced stamps when rubbed with silver will leave a black

mark
on
them. Be careful when testing these and just touch a small corner or
part
of the stamp.

You can sort out some of the modern ordinary & chalky paper stamp
issues with an Ultra-Violet lamp.

Blair



What Blair says is perfectly true but you need to know whether the
paper you are testing is indeed coated with chalk; some papers are
coated with other materials, such as china clay. In addition, all
coated papers need to be distinguished from those where the filler is
added to the pulp mix. Your catalogue should tell you what the papers
are for the stamps you are interested in.

Douglas


  #5  
Old September 9th 07, 07:08 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
Rein
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Posts: 335
Default (RCSD) Chalk surface paper

Douglas,

so isn't the real problem to get coated paper distinguished from
non-coated papers???
And in such a way that the method will be non-destructive? Using silver
sounds like barbarism.

I'm not sure whether I can count on my catalogues as to what type of
papers are involved. Maybe in the early 20th century philatelists had an
obsession for chalky paper [not just Anglosaxon countries but also
Portugal, Switzerland] but later on - and certainly in the last few
decennia - hardly anybody cares for the paper itself. They may want to
distinguish types of phosphor and the like, but not the base paper or the
immediate coatings underneath the printing inks....

groetjes, Rein


Op Sun, 09 Sep 2007 18:35:25 +0200 schreef Douglas Myall
:


"Blair (TC)" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Sep 9, 9:55 am, "news.knology.net" wrote:
How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?



Chalky paper, used especially on British stamps, is easy to

identify.
Chalk-surfaced stamps when rubbed with silver will leave a black

mark
on
them. Be careful when testing these and just touch a small corner or
part
of the stamp.

You can sort out some of the modern ordinary & chalky paper stamp
issues with an Ultra-Violet lamp.

Blair



What Blair says is perfectly true but you need to know whether the
paper you are testing is indeed coated with chalk; some papers are
coated with other materials, such as china clay. In addition, all
coated papers need to be distinguished from those where the filler is
added to the pulp mix. Your catalogue should tell you what the papers
are for the stamps you are interested in.

Douglas





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  #6  
Old September 9th 07, 08:38 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
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Posts: 2,049
Default (RCSD) Chalk surface paper

On Sun, 09 Sep 2007 20:08:43 +0200, Rein wrote:

Douglas,

so isn't the real problem to get coated paper distinguished from
non-coated papers???
And in such a way that the method will be non-destructive? Using silver
sounds like barbarism.

I'm not sure whether I can count on my catalogues as to what type of
papers are involved. Maybe in the early 20th century philatelists had an
obsession for chalky paper [not just Anglosaxon countries but also
Portugal, Switzerland] but later on - and certainly in the last few
decennia - hardly anybody cares for the paper itself. They may want to
distinguish types of phosphor and the like, but not the base paper or the
immediate coatings underneath the printing inks....


Except, maybe for those WEIRDO Belgian RR papers. :^) White paper,
phosphor, polyvalent, blah, blah, blah...
  #7  
Old September 9th 07, 08:39 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,049
Default (RCSD) Chalk surface paper

On Sun, 09 Sep 2007 12:08:57 -0700, Sir F. A. Rien
wrote:

Really ... "They may want to distinguish types of phosphor and the like,
but not the base paper or the immediate coatings underneath the printing
inks...." ???

Chalk surface is a -=major=- distinction in GB Edwardian period and
continues through some George.


Also, within the Commonwealth.
  #8  
Old September 10th 07, 10:29 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
Jay T. Carrigan
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Posts: 116
Default Chalk surface paper

I picked up this tip at a show this past weekend.
If the watermark is nearly impossible to see, even
in fluid, then it's chalk surfaced paper.

Jay Carrigan
www.jaypx.com


In article ,
says...

"news.knology.net" found these unused words:

How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?

Lightly stroke with a piece of silver solder. Grey mark - surfaced.
Do it on the edge or other area and it will clean off with an artist's gum
eraser - NOT, NOT a pencil eraser !!!


  #9  
Old September 11th 07, 12:49 AM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,049
Default Chalk surface paper

On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 21:29:15 GMT, (Jay T.
Carrigan) wrote:

I picked up this tip at a show this past weekend.
If the watermark is nearly impossible to see, even
in fluid, then it's chalk surfaced paper.


That is an interesting find. A goodie to check on some el cheapo GB
with watermark fluid, tongs and stamps for the test. Thanks for
sharing!


Jay Carrigan
www.jaypx.com


In article ,
says...

"news.knology.net" found these unused words:

How can you tell if a stamp is chalk surfaced or not?

Lightly stroke with a piece of silver solder. Grey mark - surfaced.
Do it on the edge or other area and it will clean off with an artist's gum
eraser - NOT, NOT a pencil eraser !!!

  #10  
Old September 12th 07, 02:25 PM posted to rec.collecting.stamps.discuss
malcolm
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Posts: 232
Default Chalk surface paper

If trying to identify using the uv lamp scan the back as well as the
front. If the back reacts too the flourescing agent has been added to
the paper at the manufacturing stage and is not a coating. This does
not mean that the stamp has/has not got a coating in addition - but
will help in any process of elimination. Also check for a dated
postmark. Any stamp with a postmark before the date of the new issue
will be 99% certain to be the first issue ( unless the postmark date
has been set in error). Regrettably the opposite cannot be said as
stamps from the first issue can "hang around" for months after the
date of the second. However stamps used years after the date of change
are most likely to be the second issue. As in most of these matters
comparison with a known example is the best guide. Also coated papers
tend to have a "sharper" image than uncoated. As an alternative to dry
lips use the very tip of your little finger ( this is very sensitive )
and a coated paper should feel smoother.

Any further "old wives tales" on this subject would be welcome.
Probably a combination of methods will elicit a high probability of
correct indentification

Malcolm





 




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