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Removing baked enamel from coin



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 10th 05, 02:05 PM
spamnot
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

Hello fellow collectors,
I have a nice quarter eagle that has the Indian painted and glossed over
with a baked enamel surface. Is there any effective way to easily remove
this without *too much* damage to the coin? The coin, in my opinion, is
already damaged due to the extra "artwork", but I would like to get it back
to the look of just gold without scraping the metal surfaces. Has anyone
ever encountered this or have any suggestions? Thanks in advance...


Ads
  #2  
Old November 10th 05, 02:09 PM
Wes Chormicle
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

Acetone?


"spamnot" wrote in message
ink.net...
Hello fellow collectors,
I have a nice quarter eagle that has the Indian painted and glossed over
with a baked enamel surface. Is there any effective way to easily remove
this without *too much* damage to the coin? The coin, in my opinion, is
already damaged due to the extra "artwork", but I would like to get it
back to the look of just gold without scraping the metal surfaces. Has
anyone ever encountered this or have any suggestions? Thanks in advance...



  #3  
Old November 10th 05, 02:59 PM
Alan Marshall
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

most enameled coins are pre engraved to get a depth of colour, if you remove
it i think you find the coin pretty dire.



"Wes Chormicle" wrote in message
et...
Acetone?


"spamnot" wrote in message
ink.net...
Hello fellow collectors,
I have a nice quarter eagle that has the Indian painted and glossed over
with a baked enamel surface. Is there any effective way to easily remove
this without *too much* damage to the coin? The coin, in my opinion, is
already damaged due to the extra "artwork", but I would like to get it
back to the look of just gold without scraping the metal surfaces. Has
anyone ever encountered this or have any suggestions? Thanks in
advance...





  #4  
Old November 10th 05, 03:01 PM
[email protected]
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

I seriously doubt you can get it off the coin without damaging the
coin. My suggestion is that you put it in a bezel and give it to your
wife or girlfriend (but not both!).
TD

  #6  
Old November 11th 05, 12:57 AM
Jonathan_ATC
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

"e" wrote in message
...
In article . net,

"spamnot" wrote:


Hello fellow collectors,
I have a nice quarter eagle that has the Indian painted and glossed over
with a baked enamel surface. Is there any effective way to easily remove
this without *too much* damage to the coin? The coin, in my opinion, is
already damaged due to the extra "artwork", but I would like to get it

back
to the look of just gold without scraping the metal surfaces. Has anyone
ever encountered this or have any suggestions? Thanks in advance...


i did a silver eagle like that by soaking it carefully in
laquer thinner. but thats just a bullion coin.


If it is "real" enamel, which is kiln-fired glass, laquer thinner won't
work.
To remove real enamel, one would have to suspend the coin vertically and
fire in a kiln until the enamel ran off the coin. But, I doubt the OP has
access to a kiln to do this.
That said, it could be the same kind of coloring you experienced, colored
epoxy resin. This COULD be removed by soaking in laquer thinner.

Jonathan_ATC


  #7  
Old November 11th 05, 12:57 PM
Dave Hinz
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 00:57:47 GMT, Jonathan_ATC wrote:

If it is "real" enamel, which is kiln-fired glass, laquer thinner won't
work.
To remove real enamel, one would have to suspend the coin vertically and
fire in a kiln until the enamel ran off the coin. But, I doubt the OP has
access to a kiln to do this.


Not to mention, I'm pretty sure gold melts before glass...

  #8  
Old November 11th 05, 01:16 PM
Jeff R
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin


"Dave Hinz" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 00:57:47 GMT, Jonathan_ATC

wrote:

If it is "real" enamel, which is kiln-fired glass, laquer thinner won't
work.
To remove real enamel, one would have to suspend the coin vertically and
fire in a kiln until the enamel ran off the coin. But, I doubt the OP

has
access to a kiln to do this.


Not to mention, I'm pretty sure gold melts before glass...




Ummm - how is glass enamelling done to gold or silver or copper, then?

(A.: the glass doesn't have to "melt" as such - it "fuses" and/or "softens".
Copper only has to be red-hot for this to happen to the enamel.)

Irrelevant to the question at hand, though. Reheating would *not* cause
the glass to "drip" off, though heating then rapid quenching in water could
well crack it off nicely.

--
Jeff R.


  #9  
Old November 11th 05, 01:42 PM
richard schumacher
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Posts: n/a
Default Removing baked enamel from coin

In article . net,
"Jonathan_ATC" wrote:

If it is "real" enamel, which is kiln-fired glass, laquer thinner won't
work.
To remove real enamel, one would have to suspend the coin vertically and
fire in a kiln until the enamel ran off the coin. But, I doubt the OP has
access to a kiln to do this.


What is the melting point of 90/10 Au/Ag alloy? How does that compare
to kiln firing temperatures?


That said, it could be the same kind of coloring you experienced, colored
epoxy resin. This COULD be removed by soaking in laquer thinner.

  #10  
Old November 11th 05, 02:08 PM
Jonathan_ATC
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Default Removing baked enamel from coin

"Jeff R" wrote in message
u...

"Dave Hinz" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 00:57:47 GMT, Jonathan_ATC

wrote:

If it is "real" enamel, which is kiln-fired glass, laquer thinner

won't
work.
To remove real enamel, one would have to suspend the coin vertically

and
fire in a kiln until the enamel ran off the coin. But, I doubt the OP

has
access to a kiln to do this.


Not to mention, I'm pretty sure gold melts before glass...




Ummm - how is glass enamelling done to gold or silver or copper, then?

(A.: the glass doesn't have to "melt" as such - it "fuses" and/or

"softens".
Copper only has to be red-hot for this to happen to the enamel.)

Irrelevant to the question at hand, though. Reheating would *not* cause
the glass to "drip" off, though heating then rapid quenching in water

could
well crack it off nicely.

--
Jeff R.

That's how I get all the enamel off projects that get screwed up. I heat
the piece with torch and quench it. The enamel "pops" off nicely. However,
one had better have safety glasses on as it really pops. I've never tried
reheating it in the kiln, but figured that would work too. Why would it not
work?

Jonathan_ATC


 




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