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"They'll be worth something someday"



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 16th 05, 03:46 PM
Paul Anderson
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Default "They'll be worth something someday"

I spent some $2 bills, dollar coins and 2005 buffalo nickels at a White
Castle in New York yesterday. This caused quite a stir and competition
among the workers to buy up these denominations.

One worker said he was buying the $2 bills because "they'll be worth
something someday". I've heard this before and wonder why people think
this about coins or bills that clearly will never be worth more than
face value.

It has been disproven time and time again, but people still think it.
Everything from bicentennial quarters to $2 bills to half dollars to
state quarters to dollar coins NEVER EVER are worth more than face
value, yet there's this allure or myth of "worth something someday"
that is apparently irresistable.

I guess I know why it happens, but it never ceases to amuse me.

Paul

--
Paul Anderson
OpenVMS Engineering
Hewlett-Packard Company
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  #2  
Old May 16th 05, 03:51 PM
Anita
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On Mon, 16 May 2005 14:46:22 GMT, Paul Anderson
wrote:
....
It has been disproven time and time again, but people still think it.
Everything from bicentennial quarters to $2 bills to half dollars to
state quarters to dollar coins NEVER EVER are worth more than face
value, yet there's this allure or myth of "worth something someday"
that is apparently irresistable.


I tend to think this way, too, Paul. I tend to think that something I
don't see every day will be worth something one day. The thinking is
probably true, but now I have to add that I probably won't be around
when that day comes.

She who recently cashed in $300 of circulated state quarters. They
would be worth something *some*day :- Anita
  #3  
Old May 16th 05, 04:19 PM
Wasdin, Jake E.
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Well, really, I think that 100 years from now, a bicentennial will be
just as valuable to collecters as a 1965.


Paul Anderson wrote:
I spent some $2 bills, dollar coins and 2005 buffalo nickels at a White
Castle in New York yesterday. This caused quite a stir and competition
among the workers to buy up these denominations.

One worker said he was buying the $2 bills because "they'll be worth
something someday". I've heard this before and wonder why people think
this about coins or bills that clearly will never be worth more than
face value.

It has been disproven time and time again, but people still think it.
Everything from bicentennial quarters to $2 bills to half dollars to
state quarters to dollar coins NEVER EVER are worth more than face
value, yet there's this allure or myth of "worth something someday"
that is apparently irresistable.

I guess I know why it happens, but it never ceases to amuse me.

Paul



--
*/Jake Wasdin/*


  #4  
Old May 16th 05, 04:27 PM
Edward McGrath
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Geez you gotta get some books on modern paper money if you think bills
are only worth face value. 2003 B (NY) $1 star note in crisp
uncirculated condition worth $100, and there are plenty of others.
Knowledge is the key to paper money collecting.

  #5  
Old May 16th 05, 04:29 PM
Cliff
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On Mon, 16 May 2005 11:19:22 -0400, "Wasdin, Jake E."
wrote:

Well, really, I think that 100 years from now, a bicentennial will be
just as valuable to collecters as a 1965.


Paul Anderson wrote:
I spent some $2 bills, dollar coins and 2005 buffalo nickels at a White
Castle in New York yesterday. This caused quite a stir and competition
among the workers to buy up these denominations.

One worker said he was buying the $2 bills because "they'll be worth
something someday". I've heard this before and wonder why people think
this about coins or bills that clearly will never be worth more than
face value.

It has been disproven time and time again, but people still think it.
Everything from bicentennial quarters to $2 bills to half dollars to
state quarters to dollar coins NEVER EVER are worth more than face
value, yet there's this allure or myth of "worth something someday"
that is apparently irresistable.

I guess I know why it happens, but it never ceases to amuse me.

Paul


I believe that people back in 1916 probably had the same kind of
attitude towards people that picked up the new standing liberty
quarter or walking liberty half and said, hey, these might be worth
something some day.

Paul, you take a very cavilier attitude towards other people seeing
something out of the ordinary. And you say that "coins or bills that
clearly will never be worth more than face value". Who are you to be
"amused" at other people putting things away for a hopeful future
appreciation? Why do you laugh at potential new collectors, who may
start collecting coins or currency just because of the strange new
items you've paid with?

This elitist attitude is the one you see at coin shows where dealers
decide you can't afford their coins before you even get to their table
or the attitude that collectors show to people coming into this group
with a simple question about something that seems out of the ordinary.
This attitude is what will spell a death knell to collecting long
before the endless new items being put out by the mint or the guys on
TV that offer coins at some what inflated prices. If the TV or the
mint web site are the only places people can get information without
being laughed at, then that is where they are going to get their
coins. If they like what they get and feel like the price is OK by
them, then they spend their money as they like.

Just don't look down your nose the next time you bring a little cheer
into someones life by spending that half dollar or two dollar bill.
Cliff

  #6  
Old May 16th 05, 04:37 PM
stonej
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Paul Anderson wrote:
I spent some $2 bills, dollar coins and 2005 buffalo nickels at a

White
Castle in New York yesterday. This caused quite a stir and

competition
among the workers to buy up these denominations.

One worker said he was buying the $2 bills because "they'll be worth
something someday". I've heard this before and wonder why people

think
this about coins or bills that clearly will never be worth more than
face value.

It has been disproven time and time again, but people still think it.


Everything from bicentennial quarters to $2 bills to half dollars to
state quarters to dollar coins NEVER EVER are worth more than face
value, yet there's this allure or myth of "worth something someday"
that is apparently irresistable.

I guess I know why it happens, but it never ceases to amuse me.

Paul

--
Paul Anderson
OpenVMS Engineering
Hewlett-Packard Company




They think that because they usually see so few of them that they think
they are scarce and will be valuable some day. If they would take the
stuff to a coin dealer they would be greatly disappointed of course.


I have no illusions of great future value but I like to collect AOL
discs in their various packaging. I don't know how many I have but it
is a lot of them. Just picked up one at Burger King for AOL 9.0
promoting
the new Star Wars movie. It will be interesting to see how many
different ones I can find over the years.

One person has around 1000 different ones and there is some collector
demand as they are being sold on Ebay.

  #7  
Old May 16th 05, 04:55 PM
Slopoet17
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Hear, hear, Cliff. I feel exactly as you do. And as I recently sold a
roll of circulated Bicentennial quarters for 3 times face ($30 for the
roll) at auction, I have facts to support the claims.

But keep on putting your $2's and Sacagaweas and Bisons out there,
Paul. We'll be glad to cash in on your ignorance. You clearly don't
know a thing about values of modern issues.

One man's trash is another's treasure.

  #8  
Old May 16th 05, 05:40 PM
Edwin Johnston
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stonej wrote:
snip
I have no illusions of great future value but I like to collect AOL
discs in their various packaging. I don't know how many I have but it
is a lot of them. Just picked up one at Burger King for AOL 9.0
promoting
the new Star Wars movie. It will be interesting to see how many
different ones I can find over the years.

One person has around 1000 different ones and there is some collector
demand as they are being sold on Ebay.


Well, if you ever want to recycle them, you can send them to the guys
who are trying to collect a million of them:
http://www.nomoreaolcds.com/
  #9  
Old May 16th 05, 06:55 PM
Paul Anderson
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Default

In article , Cliff
wrote:

Paul, you take a very cavilier attitude towards other people seeing
something out of the ordinary. And you say that "coins or bills that
clearly will never be worth more than face value". Who are you to be
"amused" at other people putting things away for a hopeful future
appreciation?


I didn't intend to belittle those who think these denominations are
"valuable".

Why do you laugh at potential new collectors, who may start
collecting coins or currency just because of the strange new items
you've paid with?


This is part of the reason I spend $2s, dollar coins and halves, and
why I am putting a bunch of the new nickels in circulation. It's a
little bit of education, exposing people to coins and bills they might
not often see, a little bit of trying to get these denominations in
circulation. I would love it if one of the people at White Castle
picked up a coin book because of the money I spent there.

Once they picked up a coin book or learned more about what it is they
have, they would hopefully know the difference between something common
and something valuable.

This elitist attitude is the one you see at coin shows where dealers
decide you can't afford their coins before you even get to their
table or the attitude that collectors show to people coming into this
group with a simple question about something that seems out of the
ordinary.


I love to talk to people about the coins and bills I spend. Do you
know how many times I've explained what one of the new nickels are?
I've had them refused a couple of times, but once I explain that
they're the new nickels, the person often says "oh, I heard about
these!" People, in general, love to receive the new nickels, halves,
dollar coins and $2 bills. It makes a common money transaction a bit
more fun.

Just don't look down your nose the next time you bring a little cheer
into someones life by spending that half dollar or two dollar bill.


I don't. I'm having fun with money, including getting a smile out of
someone who has just received something out of the ordinary from me.

Paul

--
Paul Anderson
OpenVMS Engineering
Hewlett-Packard Company
  #10  
Old May 16th 05, 06:57 PM
Paul Anderson
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In article .com,
Slopoet17 wrote:

But keep on putting your $2's and Sacagaweas and Bisons out there,
Paul. We'll be glad to cash in on your ignorance. You clearly don't
know a thing about values of modern issues.


Sure I do, but most of the money I spend has no value above face.

However, I do spend any 90% or 40% silver halves I get even though I
know the value of those. So if you get one of those in change, feel
free to "cash in", but it won't be due to my ignorance.

Paul

--
Paul Anderson
OpenVMS Engineering
Hewlett-Packard Company
 




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