A collecting forum. CollectingBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » CollectingBanter forum » Collecting newsgroups » Paper Money
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

"Unc.+" ???



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old April 15th 05, 05:44 PM
Berty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

When comparing grade of coin with banknotes the first thing one need to
keep in mind that unc in coin mean simple uncirculated however since
there are many condition for uncirculated coin there are 11 grade
MS60-MS70.

When it come to banknotes unc does not mean uncirculated but actually
perfect condition and this is why there is technically only one unc
grade.

The term for gem choice etc when come to unc should only be used to
tell the perfection position so for example if the note was printed off
center than it is "less than perfect" and so it might be "just"
unc or choice unc while gem unc mean perfect position.

By the way one more nice to observe is that coin which are off center
have more value however in banknotes if it is off center it have less
value.
Of course this is only up to a point where the off is "so much"
off that it become error.

Ain't life great.

Have fun.

Ads
  #12  
Old April 15th 05, 06:08 PM
Berty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It mean Ziltch. Nada, a common way to try and "upgrade" the price.

A grade have meaning only if you can give a clear definition as other
wise what stop you from tomorrow call this UNC++ and than UNC+++ and so
on.

I believe this is as bad as grade soemthing as Average circulation and
to some degree also Gem and Choice after all if Choice is MS63 than
call it MS63 as otherwise someone might consider Choice as MS62 or MS64
etc. Gem for example used to be MS67 and now it more accepted as MS65.

What a great hobby we have.

Have fun.

  #13  
Old April 15th 05, 10:08 PM
Andrew
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hello
The real problem here is nothing I have seen is documented about banknote
grades in the UNC grade
So it is all in the eye of the buyer and seller,
Usually a grade above UNC is only seller hype.
Some sellers mark all banknotes as gem .
Andrew

"Berty" wrote in message
oups.com...
It mean Ziltch. Nada, a common way to try and "upgrade" the price.

A grade have meaning only if you can give a clear definition as other
wise what stop you from tomorrow call this UNC++ and than UNC+++ and so
on.

I believe this is as bad as grade soemthing as Average circulation and
to some degree also Gem and Choice after all if Choice is MS63 than
call it MS63 as otherwise someone might consider Choice as MS62 or MS64
etc. Gem for example used to be MS67 and now it more accepted as MS65.

What a great hobby we have.

Have fun.



  #14  
Old May 1st 05, 07:33 AM
Xray
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"note.boy" wrote in
:

A note is either unc or it's not.


True.


A note that's not centred properly is an error note and being an error
makes no difference to the note's grade.


Not true.
Unless its a rather dramatic offset, its pretty much considered a flaw, not
an error.
Same with comic books, baseball cards and stamps.


I would avoid buying from anyone that is offering a note graded higher
than unc as unc is perfect, how can a note be better than perfect?


UNC does not mean perfect.
It means it has not been circulated, or at least show no signs of it.
I fail to see why this concept is so difficult for you to grasp.
You can take two notes fresh off the press, both UNC, and one might be more
appealing to the eye than the other for any number of reasons.
Chances are the will be identical, or you might favor the one on the right,
I might like the one on the left.
Who cares ? The point is is that UNC does not necessarily = perfect.
UNC + UNC Gem implies that it is indeed both uncirculated & perfect.
Which isn't to say that plain UNC can't be perfect, and in any case it will
be in the eye of the beholder to judge.
Its mostly just ebay driven hype I would suppose.
BU is another phrase subject to various interpretations.
I've seen coins with finger smudges all over them advertsied as BU, and
obviously a coin is not uncirculated if it has finger prints on it.


If the guys that print the notes can't print correctly centred notes
they should be sacked.


Obviously, both machines and humans are prone to error now and then.
Considering the vast amount of notes cranked out I'd say they do a pretty
good job - As good as humanly and mechanically possible.


A Scottish note with a centreing error would be regarded as a rare
error.


They probably would be here also if we printed the same number as the
Scots.
I don't know the exact figures, which shouldn't be too hard to obtain.
Say we print 500% more notes than Scotland.
For every note that you print, we print 500.
The probabilty of error is drastically increased, which doesn't take a
genius to figure out.


It would appear that in the USA a properly centred note is regarded as
some kind of exception. Billy


Don't know exactly what point your trying to make here.
Congradualtions, Scotland prints perfect currency.
Don't think you'll win any prize for that, and don't think too many people
outside of Scotland care about Scottish currency.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 CollectingBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.