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Interesting WWII Cover...



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 18th 03, 12:01 PM
Bob Watson
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Default Interesting WWII Cover...

I know that some of you are interested in WW2 covers and a member of our
stamp club brought in one tonight that even caught my attention!

It was an Australian airmail cover with a Japanese stamp surrounded by
Australian stamps and postmarked "HMAS Hobart". Posted on the day of the
signing of the armistice in 1945, the included letter described the
massive show of naval strength put on by the US Navy for the occasion. I
gather that HMAS Hobart was there as the Australian representative.

The member said that he was given the letter some years ago and that was
what got him started on the hobby. He said he was relieved that he
didn't soak the stamps off as he did with so much else he was given at
the time....

I am trying to persuade him to put together an album page for the Golden
Tongs Award, but just in case he doesn't, I thought I would pass it on.
There probably aren't too many Penny Blacks or Cape Triangles still
hanging around in closets or attics, but I'm sure letters like this will
be coming to light for years yet.

All the best,
Bob Watson

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  #2  
Old December 19th 03, 04:21 PM
TC
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 06:01:47 -0500, Bob Watson wrote:

I know that some of you are interested in WW2 covers and a member of our
stamp club brought in one tonight that even caught my attention!

It was an Australian airmail cover with a Japanese stamp surrounded by
Australian stamps and postmarked "HMAS Hobart". Posted on the day of the
signing of the armistice in 1945, the included letter described the
massive show of naval strength put on by the US Navy for the occasion. I
gather that HMAS Hobart was there as the Australian representative.

The member said that he was given the letter some years ago and that was
what got him started on the hobby. He said he was relieved that he
didn't soak the stamps off as he did with so much else he was given at
the time....

I am trying to persuade him to put together an album page for the Golden
Tongs Award, but just in case he doesn't, I thought I would pass it on.
There probably aren't too many Penny Blacks or Cape Triangles still
hanging around in closets or attics, but I'm sure letters like this will
be coming to light for years yet.

All the best,
Bob Watson


================================================== ==========

There have been four HMAS Hobarts

In addition to the vessel scuttled (#4) for scuba diving,
there have been three previous ships to bear the name Hobart.


1794 (Hobart #1) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The first was the former French Sloop, Revenge 18, captured
south of Sunda Strait by HMS Resistance 44 in October, 1794.
She was added to the Royal Navy and renamed Hobart after
Baron Hobart, the Earl of Buckinghamshire.

The first Hobart saw varied service in the East and completed
her life in about 1801.


1914-18 (Hobart #2) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

A second Hobart was commissioned by the Royal Navy during
World War 1. She was a trawler requisitioned for service
as a minesweeper.


1936-1941 (Hobart #3) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The third Hobart was a light cruiser of 7,105 tonnes first
commissioned as HMS Apollo for service with the Royal Navy
in January, 1936.

On 6 October 1938, she was due to transfer to the Royal
Australian Navy. Due to the mobilisation of the fleet
during the Munich crisis, she was commissioned on
28 September 1938 as HMAS Hobart. She arrived in
Australia at the end of 1939 and at the outbreak
of war was on patrol and search duties in Bass Strait.

In October 1939, Hobart sailed for service in the
Indian Ocean. She was ocean escort for the first
contingent of the Australian Imperial Force from Colombo
to the Middle East. She saw action in the Red Sea area
and was present at the evacuation of Berbera.

In August 1941, Hobart joined the Mediterranean Fleet
where she was engaged in support of the campaign in
the Western Desert, the reinforcement of Cyprus,
operations against Syria and in a series of
Mediterranean sweeps as a unit of the British
Battle Fleet.

1942-1962 (Hobart #3, continued)

With the entry of Japan into the war, Hobart transferred
to the Far East and arrived in Malayan waters in
January 1942. Hobart took part in the Coral Sea battle
in May 1942, shooting down three enemy aircraft. She
also participated in the attacks on Guadalcanal and
Tulagi in the Solomon Islands.


http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/h97753.jpg
Japanese Navy Type 1 land attack planes ("Betty") make
a torpedo attack on the Tulagi invasion force, 8 August 1942.
The ship faintly visible in the center is HMAS Hobart.
Guadalcanal is in the distance.

On 20 July 1943, the Hobart was torpedoed by a Japanese
submarine and suffered damage and casualties.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/h97945.jpg
Steaming in the Coral Sea, west of Espiritu Santo,
about two hours before she was torpedoed by
a Japanese submarine, 20 July 1943.

Two days later...
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/h80535.jpg
View taken at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, on 22 July 1943,
showing damage inflicted when she was torpedoed by a Japanese
submarine on 20 July. Photographed on the quarterdeck,
looking forward from about 207 frame port side, showing
the ship's badly distorted after deck and the
after 6-inch gun turrets.

In April 1945, Hobart covered the landings at Tarakan, Wewak,
Brunei and Balikpapan.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/k06300.jpg
(on the way to Tokyo)
A force of U.S. and Australian cruisers steams into Subic Bay
following exercises, circa August 1945.
The lead ship (in the left center distance) is either
HMAS Australia or HMAS Shropshire. Next astern is HMAS Hobart,
followed by a U.S. Navy New Orleans class heavy cruiser and
a USN Brooklyn class light cruiser. The photograph was taken
from another Brooklyn class cruiser, one of whose
6"/47 triple gun turrets is in the right foreground.

On August 31, H.M.A.S. Hobart arrived in Tokyo Bay
and was among the Australian ships present at the
Japanese surrender ceremony.

After the war, Hobart remained in commission as a unit of the
Australian squadron until August 1947, when she paid off into
reserve. She finally completed her life in 1962. .


1965 (Hobart #4) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
http://www.hobartreef.com.au/hob39.gif

The fourth HMAS Hobart was a Charles F. Adams class guided
missile destroyer in the Royal Australia Navy (DDG 39),
built in the United States of America and commissioned
in 1965 in Boston. Her role was air defence of the fleet.

Tours of duty

HMAS Hobart completed three tours of duty off South Vietnam
in 1967, 1968 and 1970. In 1968, two sailors lost their
lives and seven others were injured after the vessel was
hit by "friendly" fire. In 1988 HMAS Hobart participated
in the Hobart Bicentennial Australia Day Celebrations.

Class of ship An improved Charles F. Adams class
guided missile destroyer whose main role was air
defence of the Fleet. The design of ships of this
class was particularly versatile and she had
anti-submarine and surface gunnery capabilities.

Dimensions Length 437 feet (133.2 metres)
Beam (width) 47 feet (14.3 metres)
Displacement 4,720 tonnes
Complement 20 Officers , 312 Sailors
Design and building Keel laid October 26, 1962.
Launched January 9, 1964 by Mrs David Hay, wife
of the then Australian Ambassador to the United Nations.
Commissioned December 18, 1965 at Boston.

Built by Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, Michigan -
the second of three guided missile destroyers built for
the Royal Australian Navy.

Armament TARTAR guided missile (single rail launcher),
two 5"/54 calibre rapid fire fully automatic guns
(in single turrets). Anti-submarine torpedoes
(two triple mounts). IKARA, Australian designed and
built long-range anti-submarine weapon (fitted in Australia).

Propulsion Speeds in excess of 30 knots were obtained
from geared steam turbines on two shafts.

Command facilities The latest concepts in long range sonar,
radar, communication and electronic equipment provided
the Command with the necessary up-to-date information
in the Operations Room.

Accommodation All living spaces were air-conditioned.
Amenities included regular movie shows, internal news
and broadcasting services, free laundry, a canteen
stocked with a wide variety of goods and all
the latest facilities expected of modern day ships.

Cost Purchased by Australia from the United States
of America for US$45,000,000 including spare parts,
stores, ammunition etc.

Originally one of Australia's great naval destroyers,
the EX-HMAS Hobart (#4) is now Australia's most accessible
and exciting war wreck. Scuttled on November 2, 2002,
at Yankalilla Bay, the ship is now a premier eco-tourism
dive site, home to an array of marine flora and fauna and
a declared a marine reserve. It's also a lasting memorial
to the ship and its crew, and a valuable tourist attraction
for South Australia.

90,000 square metres of the ship will be open for diver
access, this includes access to an engine room, missile
launcher, gun turrets and both funnels.

The Hobart will be the only artificially prepared naval
wreck in Australia where divers can gain access to
an engine room.

Blair



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  #3  
Old December 20th 03, 07:50 PM
Bob Watson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for that info. which I will pass on to the member who I am sure
will be interested - especially the bit about Hobart #3.

All the best,
Bob Watson

TC wrote:


================================================== ==========

There have been four HMAS Hobarts

In addition to the vessel scuttled (#4) for scuba diving,
there have been three previous ships to bear the name Hobart.

1794 (Hobart #1) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The first was the former French Sloop, Revenge 18, captured
south of Sunda Strait by HMS Resistance 44 in October, 1794.
She was added to the Royal Navy and renamed Hobart after
Baron Hobart, the Earl of Buckinghamshire.

The first Hobart saw varied service in the East and completed
her life in about 1801.

1914-18 (Hobart #2) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

A second Hobart was commissioned by the Royal Navy during
World War 1. She was a trawler requisitioned for service
as a minesweeper.

1936-1941 (Hobart #3) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The third Hobart was a light cruiser of 7,105 tonnes first
commissioned as HMS Apollo for service with the Royal Navy
in January, 1936.

On 6 October 1938, she was due to transfer to the Royal
Australian Navy. Due to the mobilisation of the fleet
during the Munich crisis, she was commissioned on
28 September 1938 as HMAS Hobart. She arrived in
Australia at the end of 1939 and at the outbreak
of war was on patrol and search duties in Bass Strait.

In October 1939, Hobart sailed for service in the
Indian Ocean. She was ocean escort for the first
contingent of the Australian Imperial Force from Colombo
to the Middle East. She saw action in the Red Sea area
and was present at the evacuation of Berbera.

In August 1941, Hobart joined the Mediterranean Fleet
where she was engaged in support of the campaign in
the Western Desert, the reinforcement of Cyprus,
operations against Syria and in a series of
Mediterranean sweeps as a unit of the British
Battle Fleet.

1942-1962 (Hobart #3, continued)

With the entry of Japan into the war, Hobart transferred
to the Far East and arrived in Malayan waters in
January 1942. Hobart took part in the Coral Sea battle
in May 1942, shooting down three enemy aircraft. She
also participated in the attacks on Guadalcanal and
Tulagi in the Solomon Islands.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/h97753.jpg
Japanese Navy Type 1 land attack planes ("Betty") make
a torpedo attack on the Tulagi invasion force, 8 August 1942.
The ship faintly visible in the center is HMAS Hobart.
Guadalcanal is in the distance.

On 20 July 1943, the Hobart was torpedoed by a Japanese
submarine and suffered damage and casualties.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/h97945.jpg
Steaming in the Coral Sea, west of Espiritu Santo,
about two hours before she was torpedoed by
a Japanese submarine, 20 July 1943.

Two days later...
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/h80535.jpg
View taken at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, on 22 July 1943,
showing damage inflicted when she was torpedoed by a Japanese
submarine on 20 July. Photographed on the quarterdeck,
looking forward from about 207 frame port side, showing
the ship's badly distorted after deck and the
after 6-inch gun turrets.

In April 1945, Hobart covered the landings at Tarakan, Wewak,
Brunei and Balikpapan.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...000/k06300.jpg
(on the way to Tokyo)
A force of U.S. and Australian cruisers steams into Subic Bay
following exercises, circa August 1945.
The lead ship (in the left center distance) is either
HMAS Australia or HMAS Shropshire. Next astern is HMAS Hobart,
followed by a U.S. Navy New Orleans class heavy cruiser and
a USN Brooklyn class light cruiser. The photograph was taken
from another Brooklyn class cruiser, one of whose
6"/47 triple gun turrets is in the right foreground.

On August 31, H.M.A.S. Hobart arrived in Tokyo Bay
and was among the Australian ships present at the
Japanese surrender ceremony.

After the war, Hobart remained in commission as a unit of the
Australian squadron until August 1947, when she paid off into
reserve. She finally completed her life in 1962. .

1965 (Hobart #4) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
http://www.hobartreef.com.au/hob39.gif

The fourth HMAS Hobart was a Charles F. Adams class guided
missile destroyer in the Royal Australia Navy (DDG 39),
built in the United States of America and commissioned
in 1965 in Boston. Her role was air defence of the fleet.

Tours of duty

HMAS Hobart completed three tours of duty off South Vietnam
in 1967, 1968 and 1970. In 1968, two sailors lost their
lives and seven others were injured after the vessel was
hit by "friendly" fire. In 1988 HMAS Hobart participated
in the Hobart Bicentennial Australia Day Celebrations.

Class of ship An improved Charles F. Adams class
guided missile destroyer whose main role was air
defence of the Fleet. The design of ships of this
class was particularly versatile and she had
anti-submarine and surface gunnery capabilities.

Dimensions Length 437 feet (133.2 metres)
Beam (width) 47 feet (14.3 metres)
Displacement 4,720 tonnes
Complement 20 Officers , 312 Sailors
Design and building Keel laid October 26, 1962.
Launched January 9, 1964 by Mrs David Hay, wife
of the then Australian Ambassador to the United Nations.
Commissioned December 18, 1965 at Boston.

Built by Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, Michigan -
the second of three guided missile destroyers built for
the Royal Australian Navy.

Armament TARTAR guided missile (single rail launcher),
two 5"/54 calibre rapid fire fully automatic guns
(in single turrets). Anti-submarine torpedoes
(two triple mounts). IKARA, Australian designed and
built long-range anti-submarine weapon (fitted in Australia).

Propulsion Speeds in excess of 30 knots were obtained
from geared steam turbines on two shafts.

Command facilities The latest concepts in long range sonar,
radar, communication and electronic equipment provided
the Command with the necessary up-to-date information
in the Operations Room.

Accommodation All living spaces were air-conditioned.
Amenities included regular movie shows, internal news
and broadcasting services, free laundry, a canteen
stocked with a wide variety of goods and all
the latest facilities expected of modern day ships.

Cost Purchased by Australia from the United States
of America for US$45,000,000 including spare parts,
stores, ammunition etc.

Originally one of Australia's great naval destroyers,
the EX-HMAS Hobart (#4) is now Australia's most accessible
and exciting war wreck. Scuttled on November 2, 2002,
at Yankalilla Bay, the ship is now a premier eco-tourism
dive site, home to an array of marine flora and fauna and
a declared a marine reserve. It's also a lasting memorial
to the ship and its crew, and a valuable tourist attraction
for South Australia.

90,000 square metres of the ship will be open for diver
access, this includes access to an engine room, missile
launcher, gun turrets and both funnels.

The Hobart will be the only artificially prepared naval
wreck in Australia where divers can gain access to
an engine room.

Blair

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http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----

 




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